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Why Does My Child Pee the Bed?

This may be a question you've Googled time and time again. It's okay, we all have had our worries about our child's sleep and occasional nights spent going to "doctor Google". It's not a fun situation, but some simple changes might help improve their sleep and anxiety and, in return, lead to fewer wet sheets.



A child who wets the bed at night can be a very difficult situation for parents. It's embarrassing, frustrating, and confusing. You may feel like there's nothing you can do to help your child stop wetting their bed. However, there are ways that you can make this problem less stressful on everyone involved!


It's common.


Bedwetting is a very common problem, and most children grow out of it by age 10. It's important to remember that bedwetting has nothing to do with intelligence or social status; it affects all children regardless of these factors. However, there are steps you can take if your child continues to wet the bed after they've reached their tenth birthday.


Get to the root of the issue.


The first step to solving any problem is identifying and understanding its source. To that end, let's take a look at some of the most common causes of bedwetting:

  • Physical issues (like constipation) or mental health problems like anxiety or depression can cause your child to feel stressed out at night. Stress can lead them to have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, which leads them to wake up when they need to go pee. In addition, if they are experiencing physical pain while trying not to wet the bed, they might not be able to control their bladder enough to hold it until morning.

  • If you've recently moved into a new house or changed your sleep schedule significantly--for example by starting school earlier than usual--your child may simply need time adjust. This could also explain why some children start wetting again after summer break ends; suddenly having less time for naps means less opportunity for daytime fluids!


Don't beat yourself up if your child is an occasional bedwetter.


It's normal for kids to have occasional accidents. If your child wets the bed at night, don't beat yourself up. It's common and it doesn't mean you're a bad parent. In fact, there are many reasons why your child might be having trouble sleeping through the night:

  • They might be stressed out about something that happened during the day or at school.

  • They may not feel safe in their own home (for example, if there were loud noises outside of their window).

  • They may not understand how to use the toilet properly yet (this happens more often than you'd think!). Potty training isn't an exact science--there are always going to be some hiccups along the way as you teach your kiddo how best go about using his or her potty chair or toilet bowl instead of diapers/pull-ups at night time.*


Set realistic goals for potty training.

  • Set realistic goals for potty training.

  • Focus on the basics: set a schedule and start with the easiest step first. Don't rush it, it will take time! Don't get frustrated, it's normal to take a while. Don't get your child too excited about it; they'll feel pressure to do it even if they're not ready yet--and then we all lose out because there are still accidents happening!


Try a mattress protector.


If your child is peeing in the bed and you're at wits' end, a mattress protector may be the solution. A mattress protector is a waterproof cover that goes over the mattress to protect it from any wetness that might be present--including urine and sweat. It's easy to clean and can also be washed. Mattress protectors are especially helpful for kids who have allergies or eczema because they keep allergens out of their beds.


Make sure your child is hydrated and drinking enough water during the day.


Make sure your child is hydrated and drinking enough water during the day. If your child isn't getting enough fluids, they may be more likely to wet the bed.

If you notice that your child has a tendency to wet the bed at night but not during the day, this could mean that there are certain factors at play during sleep time (such as stress or anxiety) that aren't causing him or her any issues when awake. In this case, it's important for parents to help their children learn how best deal with these emotions so they can get better restful sleep at night.


Bedwetting is common but not something that should be ignored or belittled.


Bedwetting is a common but not something that should be ignored or belittled.

If your child is wetting the bed and you're looking for ways to help them, it's important to remember that there are many different reasons why this might be happening. Bedwetting is not something that happens because your child wants attention or because they are lazy--it's an issue with their body and requires professional treatment.

One of the biggest mistakes parents make is laughing at their children when they wet their beds or making them feel bad about themselves in any way because of this condition. You want your kid to feel comfortable talking with you about anything, including bedwetting issues; if they feel ashamed about what's happening, then they aren't going to tell anyone else either! So try not to make light of this situation by making fun of yourself either; instead focus on solutions together as a family unit (including siblings who may also have been affected).


There are a lot of reasons a child might start wetting the bed.


There are a lot of reasons a child might start wetting the bed. Some of the most common reasons include:

  • Stress and anxiety, which can be caused by many different factors, such as school or social situations

  • Lack of sleep, which is often due to stress and anxiety (see above)

  • Not drinking enough water during the day

There are also some medical conditions that can cause this problem in children who have never had an issue with bedwetting before, such as diabetes or heart disease. Genetic predisposition may also play a role in some cases--if your family has had members who experienced nighttime incontinence as children or adults, it's possible that your child will develop this issue too.


Bedwetting isn't just an issue with kids and teens, it's also common among adults.


Bedwetting isn't just an issue with kids and teens, it's also common among adults. If you're an adult who's been experiencing bedwetting, there are a few things to consider:

  • Bedwetting is often a symptom of a larger problem--it doesn't mean that your body can't control its bladder when it needs to. The issue may be physical or psychological in nature; it could be caused by a medical condition (like diabetes or kidney disease) or simply due to stress in your life.

  • You don't need to feel embarrassed about this problem! There are many ways you can treat it so that you won't have to worry about wetting the bed at night anymore.

Experts don't agree on what causes bedwetting, but there are some common factors that can contribute to it.


If your child has started wetting the bed, it can be a stressful and embarrassing time for everyone involved. Bedwetting is not a medical problem, but there are some common factors that can contribute to it.

Bedwetting isn't just a kid problem--it's also common among adults. In fact, about one out of 10 people will experience at least one episode of nocturnal enuresis (involuntary urination during sleep) before age five or six; most will outgrow this by age 12 or 13.

But why does this happen? Experts don't agree on what causes bedwetting exactly, but there are some common factors that can contribute:

  • Smaller bladder capacity than adults have

  • Poor coordination between brain signals and bladder function

  • Stressful situations like moving houses or changing schools

If your child doesn't have a medical condition and they're anxious about something or feel pressure to control their bladder during the day...


If your child doesn't have a medical condition and they're anxious about something or feel pressure to control their bladder during the day, then it may be worth considering whether anxiety is contributing to your child's bedwetting.

If you think this might be the case, talk to your doctor about what options are available for treating anxiety in children. There are many effective treatments available that can help reduce stress and improve sleep quality--and thus reduce bedwetting episodes overnight as well!


...you'll want to talk with their teacher or school counselor about ways they can help reduce the anxiety that causes your child to wet the bed at night.


If your child is experiencing stress and anxiety, they may be unable to sleep properly. This can lead to wetting the bed at night. To help reduce their anxiety, you'll want to talk with their teacher or school counselor about ways they can help reduce the anxiety that causes your child to wet the bed at night.

School staff may be able to help your child relax by giving them some extra time at recess and lunch so they have a chance for quiet time away from other kids who might be bothering them during class time; this will allow him/her time alone without feeling pressured by peers who might tease him/her about having an accident while sleeping (this is especially important if there are other children in his/her class who also suffer from enuresis). Additionally, teachers could ask each student what kinds of activities would make them feel less stressed out when coming home after school each day--and then try hard not just because it's something nice but rather because doing so would also benefit everyone else around us!


Talking with other experts and professionals can help you get past this problem

Talking to other experts and professionals can help you get past this problem.

  • Talk to your doctor. Your child's doctor may be able to give you some advice or suggest ways in which you can change the way your child sleeps at night.

  • Talk to your child's teacher. If it seems like there are issues at school related to sleep deprivation, then talk with their teachers about how they can help alleviate those problems by allowing more time for naps during the day or allowing children who stay up late at night extra time for getting up in the morning (instead of having them wake up early).

Try introducing a comfort item like a lovie


This can be as simple as a stuffed animal or blanket, but it may help. Make sure your child has a regular bedtime and that they get enough sleep each night. Little Bug lovies help with anxiety and may be a good addition to help with bedwetting situations and anxiety. If your child has a regular bedtime and gets enough sleep, then try to help them relax before bed. Try reading books together or playing games that help children relax. If these don’t work, then talk with their teachers about how they can help alleviate those problems by allowing more time for naps during the day or allowing children who stay up late at night extra time for getting up in the morning (instead of having them wake up early).


If your child is wetting the bed, it can be a stressful and frustrating situation for everyone involved. It can also be difficult to know what steps to take next if you don't know what's causing their bedwetting. The best thing you can do is talk with other experts and professionals who have experience dealing with this problem so that together you can come up with solutions that work best for your family's needs.

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